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Wednesday, January 11, 2017

In Which We Discuss All Manners Of Distress And Patrick Henry

credit:  Ascension Parish Sheriff's Office
who rescued her; she's perfectly OK

I know how this cat feels, don't you?  Everything was pretty much okay, then suddenly, it's like your entire brain is held hostage and you have no idea what in the hell is happening.   Your world is suddenly a dangerous and unknown place to you, capable of great harm and terrible uncertainty.  And all you can do is wait.  Wait and hope that someone will come along and make it all okay.

Sigh.  Boy, do I ever get it.

In the meantime, we have to try to make our own lives more comfortable until Help Arrives. If you are a Chrome user--which I am--you can download the extension Make America Kittens Again. It, in its developer's own words, replaces images of the republican outrage "with kittens because, seriously, f*** that guy".  This extension works on lots of sites, with more and more being added. Instead of looking at the TIC*, I can instead see photos of sweetly cute kittens on news sites and on Yahoo when I check my mailboxes.  (*Toddler In Chief)

And speaking of Cats, there is a movement afoot with regard to the Women's March on Washington, being held on 21 January, the day after the Great Sadness inauguration. Dubbed The Pussyhat Project, this separate movement's goal is to amass enough pink hand-knitted hats (with cat-like ears) so that marchers can wear them in Washington. I'm extremely conflicted about a couple of aspects of this movement, which I first learned of over at Meredith's blog, and I'd like to hear what you think.

Firstly, the name is a problem for me.  I actively dislike it.  I find that using it in this way, and for this purpose destigmatizes the vulgar and demeaning way the republican candidate used it to degrade women.  I disagree that co-opting it takes away the negative connotation and in some way empowers women.  It doesn't.  It merely says, "It's okay after all.  Even they use it."  And knowing his mentality, that's exactly what he'll say.

Secondly, a multitude of women will be marching on the nation's capital to remind the new administration that We Are Here and that We Matter.  Our concerns are serious ones.  We want to protect our rights to equal pay, to reproductive choice, to equal employment opportunity and advancement, to marry and love whom we wish.  We want to remind the administration that we have voices to be heard in matters of education, immigration, economic representation, and medical research funding.  Women are fighting for their equality, even now in the year 2017.  Is the gravity of these issues best served by juvenilizing and infantilizing women marchers in a hat with kitty cat ears?

I am proud to be a strong American woman.  Proud to "Use My Words"--my best and most erudite ones whenever possible.  Proud that I did not fall for the carcass of hate and fear and bigotry that the republican candidate dragged in.  One of the brave patriots of this country seems like a mystic now when he said to Congress back in 1775:

"...it is natural to man to indulge in the illusions of hope. We are apt to shut our eyes against a painful truth, and listen to the song of that siren till she transforms us into beasts. Is this the part of wise men, engaged in a great and arduous struggle for liberty? Are we disposed to be of the number of those who, having eyes, see not, and, having ears, hear not, the things which so nearly concern their temporal salvation? For my part, whatever anguish of spirit it may cost, I am willing to know the whole truth; to know the worst, and to provide for it."

Oh, Patrick Henry!  What you must think of us now.  Just like that cat in the garage door, I'll bet.

44 comments:

  1. Have you seen 'Idiocracy' (2006)? A friend of mine recommended it, and, based on the reviews I've read, it's frighteningly prescient. I haven't heard about the kitten hats, but - just at first glance, mind you - a throng of women wearing cute pink hats with animal ears doesn't seem to convey the message, 'We are competent adults who will not accept being treated as objects, demand fair and equal treatment in society, and expect to be treated as such." I get the subtext, but in the age of Snapchat and Instagram, one has to think about how the image will come across to someone who just glances at a website or the front page of the newspaper. I'm afraid the message that's intended would not be the one that would be immediately evident. And maybe I'm showing my age here, but for some reason, this whole 'women with animal ear hats' thing makes me think of the outfit that the Playboy Club employees wore (still wear? No idea.) Another thought, since I'm apparently writing a stream-of-consciousness comment at this point: What would Michelle Obama do? Granted, I don't know her, but I can't really see her in a pink hat with ears. But maybe that's just me.

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    1. MsCaroline--Lovely to see you here again! Happy New Year.

      No, I have not seen "Idiocracy", but I am familiar with its plot. If it is on the Netflix, I'll watch it if I can possibly stand it. Right now, I am trying not to fracture my already-fragile Zen any more than it already is.

      I completely agree with you on all of your thoughts. First, OPTICS. How serious will our message come across if we are a sea of pink kittycat ears? Second, the strong throwback to the Playboy Bunny persona. Women are already objectified; we don't need to fling ourselves back to a time when that sort of objectification was first capitalized on and made acceptable in the worst possible way. Third, you've hit upon a great new slogan for Democratic Women Everywhere: WHAT WOULD MICHELLE OBAMA DO? Like you, I don't know her personally by any stretch of the imagination, but I cannot see that strong, smart, compassionate, proud Democratic Woman wearing a pink kittycat hat. Not when the stakes are this high.

      Again, good to see you. I hope you ushered in 2017 in good health and happily.

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    2. MsCaroline makes a really good point. When I heard about the pink hats, my first thought was that it would make good photos. Old Advertising ploy ... get their attention. But the comment that itmis the wrong image is a very good one from both her and you. The suffragettes used to dress all in white. Better.

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  2. Along those lines, if I understand correctly, not only should I not watch the inauguration, but I should tune the TV to a different channel so that lowers the % numbers watching the Loss of Sanity ceremony. I'm thinking Hallmark channel? We'll be out in nature hopefully, breathing....

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    1. Sillyak--I had not heard about the ratings thing, but then again, I'm not on any social media platform. I won't be watching--for the record--regardless of any movement to effect a resistance. Like you, I will be doing something Constructively Blissful With The Television Off.

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  3. I'm making one of those hats! For a friend's toddler to wear at Cincinnati's version of the walk. I also was conflicted - she wants a hat for herself too, but I think I'll "run out of time" & just get the one done for the 2 year old. But yes, not exactly the image I'd want to convey. Of course, I'm one of those women who is always complaining that the girls/young women of today have totally set back the women's movement. They argue that they should be able to dress/act/speak in whatever manner they want without repercussion - and yes, they SHOULD. But, given that we've just elected the TIC I'm pretty sure that the reality is that they really can't. Sigh.

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    1. Bug--You know, I don't question the devotion and commitment of anyone making the hats. Honestly, I don't. And, to be completely fair, embedded in the text of the PhP site, the hats don't have to have the cat ears, but the overriding theme is That Word. And I find it pejorative and dehumanizing and vulgar in the extreme.

      I don't complain that the younger women have necessarily set back The Movement; rather, that they don't appreciate the struggle and are shoulder-shruggingly willing to let things slide backward due to that sense of entitlement and laziness. They take for granted so many things and don't recognize what Went Before in order for them to be living the life they are.

      (Excuse me while I go take someone's ball and keep it now because it landed in my yard. Ha ha.)

      Also on the PhP site are photos of the movement's founders. Three guesses at how old they are. Sigh.

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  4. I am actually doing the march in DC, but I refuse to wear one of those hats. I am walking with two female friends (I state that since anyone can march) and they won't wear them either. The whole connotation is wrong IMO. Seeing a mass of pink---and pink "kitten" ears at that---is not the image I would like to project. If they had come up with some hat to convey "nasty woman," maybe I would have gone with that.

    That said, I think we should focus on the march itself and the numbers of people participating. We really don't need some symbol like a hat to tie us all together. Our local news station (which is a DC station) reported that 1800 bus parking permits have been obtained for the march and only 200 have been obtained for the inauguration. I loved hearing those numbers!

    A friend shared a link to photos from the 1913 Women Suffragettes march (on Washingtonian's site if you wish to look). While those were very different times and their event was in March, I would far prefer to dress like them than wear a pp hat.

    Random trivia ... Son was an extra in the We the People movie filmed at Patrick Henry's Scotchtown home in VA. You can even see him in the trailer.

    I do feel like that cat. Just like him, I find it hard to breathe each day. I'm not counting on anyone to rescue me. I'm doing as much as I can and hope everyone else is as well, but I definitely wouldn't mind some divine intervention!

    Shirley

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    1. Shirley--Thank you for marching. I agree that using the moniker of "nasty women" and throwing that epithet back in his face would be far more effective and empowering. Better yet, a sea of white hats and clothing like our brave Suffragette ancestors would be even more impressive and inspiring. Think of the optics of that, let alone the symbolism!

      Terrific news about the attendance figures you shared. Again, I applaud your participation in the March.

      I listened to President Obama's Chicago speech this week with much sadness but much attention. He told all Democrats to organize and be active. You're right; we have to save ourselves.

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  5. First off, wishing you and yours a very Happy New Year.
    I don't like to knit, I do love to crochet and I could come up with a suitable crochet hat pattern, but I will not.
    To begin with, I find it a little offensive to suggest that all women should be represented by the color pink. Not to mention, in my sordid mind, this is how that train ran - pink; only girls - kitty cat ears; we know this will be viewed as the slang word for a women's vagina.
    We are dealing with crash men here who have little or no regard for women and cover that fact up with how much they respect women and just want to protect us, sweet little darlings, from everything, even ourselves.
    With the incoming administration, we will indeed need protection. These archaic neanderthals would love to send women's rights back to the dark ages.
    I plan on watching the inauguration, any and all press conferences and reading as much as I can, at times between the lines. It's best to keep an eye on an adversary.
    Rant over...

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    1. Denise Fortney--Hi, Denise, and Happy New Year to you and your family as well. It's always nice to hear from you in Comments.

      It's exactly supposed to be a reference to the slang term for a woman's genitalia. It is a direct response to the Access Hollywood tape in which he was talking to Billy Bush about how he takes advantage of women--he "grab(s) 'em by the pussy. (He) can do anything. Here is the entire tape and its transcript. But by taking the term and "goofing" on it, supposedly the organizers are kind of throwing the term back in his face and empowering women...?

      You are correct: the term "kitten" used to be used quite a bit in the Mad Men age by men of all ages when referring to girls and women alike. And we are, as you said, dealing with crass neanderthals who are more than happy to return us to those days. (Here's a really great musical take on this. I hope lots of young women are listening to this song.

      You know, I used to tell my students to watch the President's speeches and pressers on TV all the time. "Listen for the doubletalk and edges of lies," I told them. "It's your country, your life, your future! Don't let anyone put anything over on you. I taught you how to listen. Now do it." So I absolutely advocate for your "Scouting The Enemy" strategy. Right now, however, I have to, in the words of a Very Dear Smart Friend, Practice Radical Self-Care. And that means a bit more cocooning for now.

      You watch for me. And you can always, always rant here as often and as long as you like.

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    2. AAAARRRGGHHHHH!!!! Here is the other part of that parentheses set!

      )

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  6. Oh my! I agree with you 100% (or more). I've commented on other blogs where people are knitting "the hat" that 1) I find the term/name degrading and 2) I can't see where making and wearing them in a march is really going to impact the TIC (love that!!) at all. I had not even thought of (probably from trying not to think about it at all) the entire Playboy Bunny similarities...how awful! I'm exhausted from it all.

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    1. Vera--Please put your feet up, breathe deeply, and cuddle a cat. I hate that you are exhausted.

      But I get it.

      You know, I applaud all the knitters and crocheters for Using Their Powers For Good. Because I honestly do believe that it is nothing but Good Intentions, completely and thoroughly. I do. For everyone.

      But it's Shock Value, really. And despite the TIC using that strategy as his path to victory, Shock Value accomplishes little of real substance in the long run. Which, sadly, will become all to apparent soon enough to everyone.

      As Shirley said, above, let's hope that we can instead focus on the sheer strength in numbers of the march and their overarching message.

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  7. Brave women. I admire them, even though I think the tactic is not a good one.
    Loving this post, Nance. A very thoughtful and unusual take on the protest process. I do not think that marches are going to do much for the next while. Not until things are repealed and messed up enough that even the most oblivious will notice. Note that Canada has just put a really tough woman in as Foreigh Affairs Minister. I am looking forward to seeing how she will handle USA rleationships. She is not pretty and shapely either. But , boy, does she know her stuff.

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    1. Mary G--Thank you. As to "the most oblivious", that is who will be sitting in The Big Chair. I know what you mean about Marches, but look at the Civil Rights Movement in America. It took quite a few, but it was the Marches that got things rolling.

      Oh, Canada! Just when I think I could not love you more! XXOO

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  8. Pussyhats?! No, no, and no! That is, in effect, saying "we are pussies." Holy crap! I DO like the 'nasty woman' defense, though, because it shows that DJT chose the wrong people to mess with, and 'nasty' can have interpretations that do not necessarily degrade women, and make us sound as if we are more in control. I am very proud of congressman Luis Gutiérrez for making a public announcement about skipping the inauguration of the TIC and for participating in the Women's march!

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    1. Ortizzle--I had not heard about Congressman Gutierrez's stand. Bravo! I'm off to Google the info.

      You know, in this digital age, the optics are really what matters. Pink kittycat ears on women...the message is flawed and juvenile on the face of it. And when you add in the pejorative term, no amount of 'taking the word back' or any of that (and I don't want that icky term to begin with!) legitimizes it for me.

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    2. Ortizzle--I did some research, and your congressman made my point so very, very well in an interview just two days ago when he said this (and I am quoting from transcript found here):

      "...one of the primary reasons is, that I will not go to this inauguration—and let’s—I want to be clear: I went to George Bush’s inauguration, I’ve been here for 25 years, this is my 25th year in Congress, so I’ve been to quite a few, Republican and Democrat, inaugurations—was exactly that statement. I cannot unhear it. My mind doesn’t work so that I can eliminate those expressions of the president-elect, Donald Trump. And what did he say? They tried to normalize it during the campaign by saying that it was simply the talk of people in a gym. Right? Well, it’s not. And if anyone were to say that in a locker room—and I go to—I’ve been to a locker room here in Congress, right here in the Rayburn Building; thousands of days I spent in that locker room over the last 24 years. And I’ll tell you, I’ve never heard such an expression. And if I did hear such an expression, it would not go unchallenged by me. And I don’t believe that it is normal. It is abnormal for me to hear those kinds of expressions. And for me to have to stand by and normalize those kinds of expressions at an inauguration is something I cannot do that. I cannot look at my wife and my daughters and my grandson in the face if I were to stand at that inauguration."

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    3. Nance--- Gutiérrez is indeed awesome. The fact that he is Hispanic makes it even sweeter, I think (NO "PUSSIES" and "NO RAPISTS"...!)

      I was just reading a comment further down about how being offended by the word "pussy" is a generational thing. Could be. For me, it is not the use of strong language per se, but rather the individual word itself. I use strong language all the time... hardly a day goes by that I do not use the F word. That said, literal vs. figurative also plays into the equation. I only use the F word to express anger. Never in the literal sense. I remember being shocked when I first came back to the States and would hear women casually comment, for example, (in a group of only women) "He's really hot. I would totally f*ck him." My jaw dropped. And still does when I hear anyone use it in the literal sense. We are not talking about sleazy ghetto girls--- these were college-educated, middle class women and the same age group as me!! Of course, during the quarter of a century I was not living here, quite a lot went mainstream: butt, for example. Never said that word as a kid. Suddenly, it was totally cool to say that, even on T.V.! And the Smothers Brothers got their show cancelled all those years ago for saying (I think) "hell." Also... “that sucks.” I use that expression quite a lot now, but it was a shocker the first time high school girls (my students) used it in my presence. Definitely a case of getting over the literal meaning, lol!

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    4. Ortizzle--I've done a ton of posts here regarding my own swearing. I have, in the past and many, many times, tried with varying degrees of success, to stop swearing and to stop using The Eff Word. Like you, I swear, even though I have an impressive vocabulary and use it unsparingly. And, like you, when I do use The Eff Word, it isn't as a verb. I use it in anger or frustration, mostly, as an expletive or as a modifier (i.e., "That f*ing idiot let his dog shit in my herb garden!" or "F*ck! That really hurts!").

      I remember being astonished when "bitch" became okay on prime-time, network television a couple years ago. This year, I noticed it's the word "dick," as in "Stop being such a dick."

      As a writer, devotee of The Language, former English and writing teacher, and all around Word Person, I know language changes and forms to its culture and speakers and era. In most cases, I remain fascinated and awed by the changes and accept them in all good nature. It's not My Language, per se.

      But, as so many women here have said, Language is a Powerful Tool. And so are (that buzzword) Optics and the interpretation of both. I want the Message Behind The Mission and Meaning to be clear.

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    5. Nance --- Agree with you 100%. Regarding words such as 'bitch' and 'dick' being used in common parlance in recent years/months... I am equally astonished. Especially the word ‘dick’--- it is easier, somehow, for me to accept ‘bitch’ (whether as a noun or verb, albeit demeaning). The other--- not so much. Maybe my reluctance is stronger when the words are related to private parts, haha!

      From the perspective of someone who teaches Spanish and is surrounded by 'heritage speaker' Spanish vocabulary ... I suffer in 2 languages. But as my boss is fond of saying: the common man (and woman!) rule. What is non-U today will end up in the dictionary tomorrow. (Which is why, of course, Latin is no longer a spoken language, lol.) That said, I respectfully point out these nuances to my students:

      — “Truck” is not “troca.” The standard term is “camión.” Likewise, “lunch” is not “lonche” ... and so on.

      There are actually textbooks for heritage speakers, due to the overwhelming need in states like Texas, which address their special needs in learning Spanish: they understand spoken Spanish and speak it fairly well, but are basicaly illiterate in terms of reading and writing. Message behind the Mission and Meaning: Loud and Clear!

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    6. I can't remember where I saw this, but just lately a city (?) council banned someone from using 'Moby Dick" as the name of their business because Dick is such a nasty word. I wonder how all of the men named Dick or using the word as a short form of Richard feel about this.
      Talk about illiteracy!

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    7. Hi, Mary G--Just now seeing this comment. Dumb move by the city council, of course, unless the business was a sex shop using it for a double entendre or something. I agree that, in many cases, Political Correctness can be (and has been) taken too far, and this may be one of them.

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  9. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    1. I am sure that Nance can defend herself, but why do you think it was not nice of her to mention the place where she found out about the hats? She is not denigrating Meredith, she is stating why she doesn't agree with the idea. It's her blog, and I personally think it's not "nice" of you to come over here and tell Nance what she should and shouldn't do. Just sayin'.

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    2. Teresa Kasner--Hello, and welcome to the Dept. Thanks for commenting.

      I'm a little confused. I went back to Meredith's blog, which I've been a follower of/commenter on for a while now, and checked to see if she had been inundated with nasty or negative comments since my post went up. There have been absolutely zero. My own comment on the post, which was similar to the content of my post here, ended with this quote,
      "I don't doubt for one solitary moment your seriousness, your commitment, or your deep passion for our cause as Women. It is the same as my own, and I thank you."
      So, again, I am at a loss.
      Honestly, I'm really confused.

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  10. I'm not for it either. I get it, it's subversive and shocking, but I guess I am a prude and I don't like the slang term. I think all white would be a better visual.

    I wish I wasn't all the way across the country, I would so love to march! I will be there in spirit.

    And, I just adore random members of the Thought Police. Not.

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    1. Gina--I know that some other major metropolitan areas are organizing local Marches. Even so, a huge gathering like that is not for everyone. But each Woman can Resist in her own way every single day and make sure that she is active in her community, local, and state government, and be aware of what is happening on the federal level with Women's Issues.

      As far as the people here from Meredith's blog, which I mentioned as the source of the PhP, it's okay. She has a fiercely loyal following, and they're here to defend her. I'm just not sure from what.

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  11. I have no problem with it. It's taking a word that objectifies women when used in the context that we're obviously referring to, and using it to empower women. Words are powerful tools to educate and inform and co-opting that word to make a statement against the abuse and objectification of women is brilliant.

    If I could be at the March, I would proudly wear one of the hats.

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    1. Claudia--Hi, and welcome to the Dept. As a retired English and writing teacher of thirty-plus years, I agree that words are powerful tools. I like to think of them as my Superpower. It's one of the many reasons I took up writing here at this space 11 years ago.

      Thanks for adding your opinion to the mix here. I asked for what people think, and I didn't do so in order to hear only those who agree with me. I think the echo chamber effect is a big reason why the country remains so divided and why even the most outrageous manufactured stories get legitimized as "news."

      As a friend of mine above who IS attending the March said, it's vitally important that we focus most on the March itself and its goals. And we can always agree to respectfully disagree.

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  12. Anybody but me having a hard time focusing on the message of this post because the picture is so disturbing?
    Not cool!

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    1. The cat that got itself in this predicament is perfectly fine. Nance already shared that in the caption.

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    2. Debbie Rinke--Hi there, and welcome to the Dept.

      It is a bit disturbing, which is why I chose to use it. I was writing about Cat-Related Things Which Are Disturbing To Me. I would never have used it, however, if the cat pictured (named Bella) was harmed in any way. I made sure to read the accompanying story, which I provided a link to in the first sentence of the post (but here it is again) to allay any fears or concerns. And as my friend from gfe, Shirley, in the comment above pointed out, I also made sure to attest to the cat's safety in the caption, too.

      And so you know that I'm Really Sincere, I want you to be aware that I am the proud owner of two rescue cats, who succeeded two previous rescue cats. My sons also owned two rescue cats (although they now own a rescue dog, pictured in my sidebar).

      Please let me know if you need anyone to vouch for my Coolness. I have about four hundred former Highschool students loaded up and ready to go.

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  13. Nance,

    I appreciate your conversation about the project. Keep in mind it is a word I detest. A word I do not use but understand why it was chosen. I would wear the hat proudly and would not be embarrassed or feel silly. In a protest people often wear things to prove a point. And I feel very strongly that those wearing the hat will be the pretty much the only ones who know the name. A sea of pink hats, no matter the name or the pattern is a strong visual for others. The pattern and project are everywhere, even on NPR last night. I applaud the creators for doing something, something they felt would have an impact no matter the name of the project. It is more than I did.

    Hugs to you,
    Meredith

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    1. Hi, Meredith--The pattern(s) and project are indeed everywhere! I was just reading about a pink yarn shortage from Dallas to Michigan and beyond. There has been plenty of publicity regarding the PhP, so I think the name will be/has been pretty widely known by now, if not certainly by the date of the March.

      I've just heard from a Marcher who is also a subscriber to my blog. She is generously going to write a guest post here detailing her experiences. Incidentally, she is wearing a pussyhat of her own design. I also got an email from a gentleman in Gettysburg, PA, also a subscriber, who told me that there are over 200 Marchers leaving from there. It's so exciting and gratifying!

      None of us should ever underestimate our value and worth as a strong woman when we advocate for not only our family but for other women. We may live it, write it, or find other outlets, may they be public or private.

      Thanks for sharing your thoughts here as well.

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  14. I have to wonder if age is the dividing line when it comes to using the term pussy. in my observation, younger women, say those 35 and under, have no problem self-identifying as a pussy. While the older crowd finds it more offensive, having come from a more proper time. As for the hats... well, in and of themselves they're cute, and if wearing one empowers a woman to fight a vulgar sexist creep like The Donald, then I'm onboard with them. Not going to make one or search one out, but you know... whatever works, works.

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    1. Ally Bean--Oh, I think age has a lot to do with ... a lot! Using that term for the female genitalia is not mainstream or positive in my/our generation, nor is it used to refer to women in general, at least not in my experience/social circles. It has always been a pejorative, coarse term used by, well, coarse and low-class men.

      I do agree with you on another point, that the hats are cute. That is another problem for me. We want to be taken seriously, as I said, since the issues for which we fight are serious ones. Wearing cute pink hats conflicts with that message, in my mind. Mixed messaging, so to speak.

      I also agree that empowering women to fight a vulgar, sexist creep like him is Important--vitally so. I remain dismayed by the strong women in this fight wearing cutesy pink kitty cat hats as their armor.

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    2. I wonder if the women who wear these hats see the hat's cartoonishness as a positive. There's a lot of video games and anime that involve strong heroines who look rather silly and cutesy to me. However, to those women who follow these characters, they see strength. I dunno. Just a thought.

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  15. I'm going to a women's March here, (my stupid tablet won't let me keep the M lower case. I've tried 4 times.) with my daughter and Ted's mom. It may rain, but we will not be wearing cute hats, no matter the name. And I do not like the name. Nor do I understand the commenters who thought you were attacking your blog friend, but sometimes the Internet can be a tricky place of misunderstandings.

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    1. J@jj.cm--Thank you for Marching (there, I've capitalized it, too!), and I'm happy to know you'll have a built-in support team of other strong women with you. I also hope it won't be raining. I've been watching the rain in Cali with great interest and hope. One map I saw showed drought conditions completely eased in large swathes of the state. It's upsetting that the rains caused terrible problems for some areas, of course; I hope things get straightened out.

      Yes, the Internet can cause lots of confusion and rash actions. It's one of the reasons I work so hard on each and every one of my posts. I want to be sure it says exactly what I mean to say, and this one does that. Thanks for adding your thoughts, and thanks again for Marching (in upper case because it IS that important).

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    2. Oh the RAIN! We have been loving it. I definitely feel for the people who are affected by flooding, or trees falling on their cars or houses (one woman in our little town was killed when a tree fell on her, and it wasn't even raining that day!), but generally I am really relieved that we've gotten so much rain recently.

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Oh, thank you for joining the fray!

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